Ross Adelman

phone: (301) 523-5272
email: radelman [at] gmail [dot] com

Welcome to my website! My name is Ross Adelman, and I'm currently a fifth-year PhD candidate in the computer science department at the University of Maryland, College Park. My research interests include scientific computing, physics-based modeling and simulation, computer graphics, and fast algorithms. I am currently working on fast and accurate boundary element methods for the Laplace and Helmholtz equations in three dimensions. My advistor is Ramani Duraiswami. Take a look below at my education, work experience, selected publications, and some projects I have worked on over the last few years. Also, please take a look at my resume.

Education

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  • PhD (expected August 2016), Computer Science, University of Maryland, College Park, August 2011 - Present
  • MS (awarded May 2013), Computer Science, University of Maryland, College Park, August 2011 - May 2013
  • BS, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, August 2007 - May 2011
Work Experience

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  • Graduate Research Assistant, University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, College Park, MD, August 2011 - Present
  • Engineering Intern, Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD, June 2006 - Present
Selected Publications

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Software

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Acoustic Scattering by Spheroids and Disks (December 2014)
As part of my PhD research, I developed a software library in MATLAB for computing the analytical solutions to acoustic scattering problems involving prolate spheroids, oblate spheroids, and disks. This library can be downloaded from this GitHub repository and is described in this JASA paper.
Related Courses

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Course Projects

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Barnes-Hut Algorithm using MapReduce (Spring 2013)
In a special topic course on MapReduce and other technologies for processing big data, I implemented a simplified version of the Barnes-Hut algorithm, a fast algorithm for solving the N-body problem, using MapReduce. My implementation ran on a Hadoop cluster set up for the class on Amazon Web Services. Here is my report, which describes my implementation.
Fast Multipole-Accelerated Radiosity (Fall 2011)
In a special topic course on the fast multipole method, for the semester-long project, I applied the fast multipole method to the radiosity rendering algorithm. I used the kernel-independent approach, where large numbers of source triangles were replaced with a smaller set of proxy triangles, which approximated their effect. Here is my report, which describes the method more completely, and my presentation.
Networked Rigid-Body Simulator (Spring 2011)
In a parallel graphics course, for one of the projects, I re-implemented as a client-server system the rigid-body simulator I wrote in the previous semester. A single machine (the server) ran the simulation, but did no rendering, and any number of other machines (the clients) could connect to the server, access the simulation, and render it. Here is my report and presentation. Here is a video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1sypmjXHaM
Rigid-Body Simulator (Fall 2010)
In a physics-based animation course, for one of the projects, I implemented a rigid body simulator. Instead of using a triangle mesh to represent the bodies, I used signed distance functions. Here is my report and presentation. Here are two videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iBVN5ZZ5Rk8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbMFPbtTWC8
Real-Time Ray Tracer (Spring 2010)
In an introductory computer graphics course, for extra credit for one of the projects, I implemented the ray tracing algorithm in GLSL. My implementation achieved around 10 - 15 frames per second. Here are two videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=55bjCK-nhD0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cIiTHC_HtSg